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Algimantas Švėgžda.
Autoportretas.
Litografija, 53x42, 1985

Algimantas Švėgžda.
Tibeto piemenims.
Popierius, akvarelė, 36,5x51, 1991

Algimantas Švėgžda.
Tibeto piemenims.
Popierius, akvarelė, 36,5x51, 1991


Algimantas Švėgžda
(1941–1996)

by Laima Laučkaitė

Algimantas Švėgžda was a charismatic personality: quiet, rational and elegant, he was one of the leaders of his generation. Švėgžda managed to find his own way among ideological and organizational bans and limitations.
He was an innovative person who successfully evaded obstacles: he even managed to apply the stylistics of pop art to the subject matter of socialist realism. After pop art, in ca. 1977 Švėgžda became interested in a new trend – hyper-realism, and became involved in a precise and consistent study of form. Through hyper-realism and the style of registering the appearance of objects, he came upon the classical realist tradition and visual contemplation of objects. In his youth Švėgžda was keen on artistic innovations, but having moved to the West in his mature age, he lost interest in Western art and began to admire Renaissance and Dutch masters, Rembrandt. He got immersed in the Oriental philosophy and gradually turned into a kind of guru, a sage contemplating the world through art. In Germany he created his famous cycles “The Search for Wisdom” (1980–84), “Conversations with Objects and People” (1984), ”For Tibetan Shepherds” (1991), “Autumn Meditations” (1993) and others, in which he represented one or several objects of nature – a fruit, a seed or a twig. Drawn from nature, isolated in a large empty space, they create an ambience of meditation and tranquillity transferring the spectator beyond the limits of time.

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