art 2002/2
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Ievos Sireikytės plakatas ÜBERFaHHrt projekte


Vilmos Šileikienės plakatas ÜBERFaHHrt projekte


Ievos Sireikytės plakatas ÜBERFaHHrt projekte


ArtGenda’s Experiments in Hamburg

by Kristina Inčiūraitė

This year the ArtGenda biennial - a festival of young artists from the countries on the Baltic Sea - was hosted by the city of Hamburg on June 6 through 23. The event was initiated in 1996 by the Danish and was held in Copenhagen for the first time. Supported by municipalities of the Baltic region, the festival has become one of the key events of the European cultural capital of the year. The event "measures" cultural potency of the region and monitors creative vitality of the artists.
Each year the festival places more emphasis on social and communicative aspects and tries to intervene into the life of the hosting town.
The ArtGenda 2002 has chosen even a more radical agenda than its predecessors had. It offered a decentralized artistic process (the works by the artists were dispersed across both lively and remote locations of the town) and exciting projects provoking communication. The participating artists, foreign and local, had thirty-three projects to chose.
Around 180 artists from 18 countries took part in the project, yet the busy and lively town almost absorbed the biennial of the young artists. It has become a silent opponent to a concurrent event, the exhibition "Art and Economics".
The ephemeral nature of the festival was too apparent, and its architectural projects were underfunded. It seemed like the festival offered too many things to choose from and invited too many artists. However, the event featured a series of vibrant and interesting projects, like House Calls, that took artists into private homes, or one of visually most impressive parts, Trust Your Local Artist, featuring video installations in the windows of the buildings around the town square, to mention but a few. Ten Vilnius based artists represented Lithuania in different projects.
The exhibition side of the festival turned out to be less important than socializing. It would be a good idea to change the nature of the event from a "serious biennial" into a summer symposium that would allow free communication of the artists.

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