art 2003/1
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Marija Teresė Rožanskaitė.
Žaliasis stalas.

1990, drobė, aliejus, 150 x 170

Marija Teresė Rožanskaitė. Armatūra. 1986, drobė, aliejus, 130 x 98

Marija Teresė Rožanskaitė.
Erdvinis asambliažas.

1987, 100 x 100 x 10

Marija Teresė Rožanskaitė.
Erdvinis asambliažas.
1990, 93 x 64 x 8


The Overview Exhibition of the Work of Marija Teresė Rožanskaitė

by Jonas Valatkevičius

Cited in the beginning of the story Viktoras Liutkus claims that Rožanskaitė’s unique idiom was largely determined by her choice of medicine as the subject of her art. To the viewer, the female painter presents images from surgery and in-patients rooms, those of medical examinations, medical equipment, and human anatomy. She is interested in human condition in the environment where the awareness of death is heightened and its proximity closer.
The artist of the senior generation has been exploring this theme since the Soviet period, often in large canvases. In recent years she has given several great performances in natural settings.
The focus on the actual reality and events taking place here and now is one of the key forces shaping the art of the painter. It was only a decade ago when her piers were fighting for the right to ignore the actual, as subject matter unfit to speak of universal values. Yet the artist has long years of experience of working against the grain. She has created an idiom, which provided for a large degree of freedom under the Soviets. Though from a formal standpoint her work then stood nearby mainstream Photographic Realism, her canvases have always been striped of any political implications. Her most recent production, like “The Chechen Woman” is no less compelling than her previous work. To achieve the effect of immediacy, the artist goes to collect information from primary sources.
Her assemblages manifest the tendency to employ a greater variety of materials and explore their formal qualities.
In her actions and installations the artist seems to be searching for the Paradise Lost. The encounter with nature employs a totally different tactics than the rules of engagement with urban reality. Rather than taking an offensive or defensive posture needed for the encounters with the city, the artist becomes protective and caring toward nature. The nature she finds is exhausted, scarred, and bleeding. It seems that the artist has always been longing to return to nature, but the town would not let her go. Therefore the overview exhibition of Rožanskaitė’s oeuvre offered an impressive psychological map of a true Lithuanian town dweller.

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