art 2003/2
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Grupė „Baltos kandys“ – Austė Jurgelionytė, Karolina Kunčinaitė, Miglė Lebednykaitė, Rasa Leonavičiūtė, Laura Pavilonytė, Julija Vosyliūtė
Susikūrė 1998
Nuo 2002 Lietuvos dailininkų sąjungos narės

Miglė Lebednykaitė. Instaliacija Arbatinukai. 2002, rankomis veltas veltinis, 22x15x12; 20x12x12

Austė Jurgelionytė. Grojantis fortepijonas. 2001, mišri technika, 12x4x5

Karolina Kunčinaitė. Debesėliai. 2002, pramoninis veltinis, 200x150

Laura Pavilonytė. Akcija Bernardinų bažnyčios sode Sustingusių veidų sodas. 2002, veltinis, techninis pluoštas

Rasa Leonavičiūtė. Palapinė, iš serijos Stebuklingi daiktai mylimiesiems. 2001, papjė mašė, autorinė technika, h 250

Grupė Baltos kandys. Mandala. 2003, veltinis, ų 300


The Transformations of Felt by the White Moths

by Austėja Čepauskaitė

The “White Moths” group of artists, established by six students of the Vilnius Academy of Art in 1998, are among the few in Lithuania who utilize felt as their main creative substance drawing on its inherent properties as well as transforming it.
The female artists Austė Jurgelionytė, Karolina Kunčinaitė, Miglė Lebednykaitė, Rasa Leonavičiūtė, Laura Pavilonytė and Julija Vosyliūtė have participated in the annual Moscow International Exposition-Fair “New Generation”. In 2003, they are to take part in the Grosse Kunst Austellung Düsseldorf NRV.
The utilizing of felt as artistic material was introduced in the Felt Symposium 1998, in Anykščiai, where Velteksa textile manufacturers were based, which initiated adoption of felt technology in the Vilnius Academy of Art.
The female artists employ felt to produce such traditional products as a rug, and unusual sculptural pieces (M. Lebednykaitė). They also offer the performance-type process of making a felt rug which is demonstrated in public to be observed (the project “I am an Artist”), combine traditional felt items and video material, or set out with multimedia projects. The project “Mandala” to be shown in Düsseldorf will feature female artists performing, having covered themselves with floral items of felt.

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