art 2004/2

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Audrius V. Plioplys. Neuronų simfonija. 2004, skaitmeninė spauda, archyviniai dažai, drobė, 137,2x366

Fragmentas

Audrius V. Plioplys. Kolumbo pėdomis. 2004, skaitmeninė spauda, archyviniai dažai, drobė, 137,2x183

Fragmentas

Audrius V. Plioplys. Šiaurinė balta grėsmė. 2004, skaitmeninė spauda, archyviniai dažai, drobė, 137,2x183

Audrius V. Plioplys: Visual Metaphors for the Mind  

by Vaidilutė Brazauskaitė

The appearance of Audrius V. Plioplys, Chicago based Lithuanian artist, at the Tallinn Print Triennial and his personal exhibition in Lithuania this autumn was refreshing for the regional art scene. For almost fifteen years, Plioplys has been working to connect two important for his career fields: neurobiology-neurology and visual arts. As an artist, he has explored different mediums, painting, photography, installation and land art. The work he showed in Lithuania represents large-scale digital images (in Adobe Photoshop) printed on canvas. According to the artist, he was the first to use ink-jet printer for large scale art work. Whatever the medium, Plioplys has always been a conceptual artist: his works are visual metaphors that emerge based on his analysis of ideas, concepts and philosophy. The two realms of his activity (earlier, he had perceived them as conflicting) are reconnected through his research into human consciousness, thoughts and human nature in general. These processes, in scientific perspective, are determined by the interaction of the myriads of neurons in the human brain. In some of his works, the artist has transformed the natural photographic images, covering them by different colour layers, in a way analogous to neurobiological processes that transform visual memories for storage in the human brain. In his Neurotheology series Plioplys has used six colours (many of his earlier works were not in colour, including installations), which is consistent with the fact that human cortex has six layers. However, his art is not an illustration of medical textbooks, but a vehicle to contemplate the processes of thinking and cognition. 
    Having lived in Toronto in his childhood, he has developed a fondness to the austere Arctic landscape. The multiple live forms existing in this hostile environment are a frequent motive of his art. Theology is another motif, in a paradoxical way relating to the artist’s Catholic upbringing. Repulsed with dogmatic Catholic education as a young adult, Plioplys has rediscovered the power of Christ’s message for himself as a mature scientist and artist.

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